News
Global Institute, Toyota Partnering To Improve Safety
June 16, 2017
The Global Institute for Motor Sport Safety and Toyota Motor Corporation have launched a four-year research project using Toyota’s Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) software to further improve safety in motorsports using computer simulation.
Global Institute, Toyota Partnering To Improve Safety

THUMS model courtesy of The Global Institute.

The Global Institute for Motor Sport Safety and Toyota Motor Corporation have launched a four-year research project using Toyota’s Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) software to further improve safety in motorsports.

The joint project covers research on collisions across motorsports disciplines and will include analysis of safety elements such as seat structures and seatbelt positioning, with a focus on minimizing spinal injury. The Global Institute, which is the safety research partner of the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), will use the results to put forward proposals to update motorsports regulations and safety equipment.

Although crash dummies are commonly used in crash tests, they do not allow for easy and detailed analysis of how collisions impact the brain, internal organs and certain other parts of the body. As a result, Toyota and Toyota Central R&D Labs Inc. have developed THUMS, which runs computer simulations of actual conditions during a crash and of the mechanisms of injury occurrence, including that of injuries to internal organs and other parts of the body.

The simulation of the human body is made up of around two million elements that accurately reproduce the human form, from precise bone strength to the structures of organs.

“The processing power of THUMS is impressive and will offer new levels of data for our research. It provides a huge amount of detail about what happens to the body in a high-speed accident,” Global Institute General Manager, Research, Laurent Mekies said.

Since 2007, Toyota has been using THUMS not only for general automobiles but also to analyze injuries from crashes in motorsports.